1. Children consuming a Mediterranean diet are 15 percent less likely to be overweight
    — Of course, it all depends on what you mean by a Mediterranean diet.
     
  2. In a recent study published in the Journal of Nutrition, IFPRI researchers Jef Leroy, Marie Ruel, and co-authors found that growth faltering, a consequence of chronic undernutrition, does not slow down after the child’s second birthday as generally believed, but continues well past that time. In fact, the study showed that nearly one-third of the total height deficit (30%) at the age of 5 is accumulated after the age of 2, that is, after the 1000 day window.
    — 

    Beyond 1000 Days: New Study Shows that Growth Faltering in Children Continues after Two Years of Age

    Seriously, did anyone honestly think that 1000 days was more than a nice, round number?

     
  3. Government leadership and substantial investment in research are needed to shift global consumption habits towards eating patterns that are both healthy and sustainable, say academics, industry and NGOs representatives in a new report. The report, Changing What We Eat, published today by the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN), part of the Oxford Martin School, University of Oxford, outlines the work needed to shift societies to consumption patterns that can meet both public health and environmental goals.
     
  4. image: Download

    The Economist says children can be helped to eat more fruit and veg.

Nudges: Greased palms and dried fruit | The Economist

    The Economist says children can be helped to eat more fruit and veg.

    Nudges: Greased palms and dried fruit | The Economist

     
  5. This is kind of shocking: an academic paper retracted because an unidentified commercial company complained it had hurt sales. The paper had some flaws, but the basic conclusion was sound.

    Badly processed cassava does cause visual problems.

     
  6. image: Download

    The overall price rise these charts graphically illustrate, and the uncertainty about their availability (which is what the recent volatility of the individual index lines show) are evidence of the threat to the nutritional security of many millions of rural and urban households in India. 

The fitful pulse of an Indian food staple | Resources Research

    The overall price rise these charts graphically illustrate, and the uncertainty about their availability (which is what the recent volatility of the individual index lines show) are evidence of the threat to the nutritional security of many millions of rural and urban households in India.

    The fitful pulse of an Indian food staple | Resources Research

     
  7. Food-based approaches to combating vitamin A deficiency continue to be largely ignored by governments and donors. This may be partly because the way of viewing them has largely been informed by the community which supports supplementation. Food-based approaches may be perceived as competitive or distracting and are thus slandered, for example claiming they are unproven or even ineffective. To the contrary, it is the supplementation approach that fails to improve vitamin A status and is even lacking in proof of impact on young child mortality in real life settings. A wide variety of common and indigenous foods are proven effective in improving vitamin A status even in short-term trials. Food based approaches are complex to implement and to evaluate and take time to mature and exert impact. But unlike supplementation, they reach all members of the community, are safe for pregnant women, have no side effects, are sustainable, and confer a wide range of benefits in addition to improving vitamin A status. Food-based approaches are also often portrayed as being expensive, but this is only true from a “donor-centric” way of viewing costs. From the point of view of host countries, communities and families who grow vitamin A rich foods, the economic benefits are likely to outweigh the costs. The 1992 ICN called for the elimination of vitamin A deficiency. The urgency of this call may have provided an excuse for the rapid implementation of supplementation programs in over 100 countries while very few have implemented national food- based approaches. It is thus important that ICN 2 instead call for the replacement of supplementation programs with sustainable food-based approaches. It should call on countries to assign responsibility and funding to specific individuals or organizations who are then given benchmarks and are held accountable to meet them. Donors could greatly assist by funding simple dietary assessment and other components of national plans for making this shift.
    — 

    Vitamin A: Moving the food-based approach forward.

    Of course, nobody who actually calls the shots, least of all the bigwigs at the Second International Conference on Nutrition, will pay the slightest attention.

     
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    Totally love this graphic: Sorry, But There’s No Such Thing As A ‘Healthy’ Sugar
     
  9. 18:09 23rd Mar 2014

    Notes: 1

    Reblogged from foodandnutritionsecurity

    Tags: Nutrition

    foodandnutritionsecurity:

    I have been quite silent these days. I guess just too much work is my excuse. The opposite can be said for what is happening with nutrition these days. Lots happening, little silence. What a year 2013 was, and a year 2014 is shaping up to be. The call for paying more attention to nutrition is…

     
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    Pretty sad story of the march of industrialised food and all the ills it brings in its wake.

 (via United Nations News Centre - Pacific island countries urged to produce more healthy, competitive foods - UN)

    Pretty sad story of the march of industrialised food and all the ills it brings in its wake.

    (via United Nations News Centre - Pacific island countries urged to produce more healthy, competitive foods - UN)